Reclamation + Remediation

Watershed restoration and reclamation of abandoned mine lands are some of the most important activities for our project. Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) is water that is affected by passage through, or alteration by, coal or abandoned coal mine environments, and it is the biggest problem we face in our watershed. The US EPA has identified AMD as the number one problem affecting water quality in Appalachia Ohio. The Office of Surface Mining concurs and suggests that southeast Ohio contains some of the most seriously AMD-impacted streams in the United States. According to a United States Department of Agriculture report written in 1985, Monday Creek was ranked as the third most severely AMD polluted stream in the State of Ohio. Contamination by AMD lowers water quality and impairs aquatic life, leaving streams unfit for fishing or swimming.

ELIMINATING ACID MINE DRAINAGE

Reducing or eliminating acid mine drainage is costly and difficult. Controlling mine drainage can happen by either treating water after it leaves a mine (treatment) or preventing the acid from being produced to begin with (source control). The Monday Creek Restoration Project is utilizing a wide variety of best available technologies tailored to meet individual site needs.

AMD treatment systems and restoration projects in the Monday Creek Watershed are listed below. Click on their names for a more detailed description and photos of the sites.

MONDAY CREEK PROJECTS:

1. Grimmett Hollow                      7. Snake Hollow

2. Jobs Hollow Doser                   8. Lost Run Phase 1

3. Rock Run Gob pile                   9. Lost Run Phase 2

4. Rock Run 24                            10. Shawnee SSLB

5. Big Four Hollow                      11. Lost Run Subsidence Closures

6. Essex Doser                           12. Rock Run Remediation

 

STREAMBANK STABILIZATION

In 1997, volunteers from Hocking College and Rural Action, the Hocking Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD), Ohio EPA and ODNR-Division of Wildlife worked on an experimental streambank stabilization project along a rapidly eroding portion of Monday Creek. In cooperation with a private landowner in Carbon Hill, we placed hardwood tree revetments at the toe of the bank and graded it back from a sheer ten-foot drop to a 2:1 grade. In the spring of 1998, students from Miller High School cut willow trees into posts and planted them at the site. The area was seeded with grass on top of the slope to prevent further erosion from occurring. This site is being periodically monitored. So far, the vegetation has taken hold and is preventing further erosion.

CHECK OUT OUR VOLUNTEER PAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WAYS YOU CAN HELP!

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